Stan Young´╗┐

Senior Research Scientist

NREL

Dr. Young serves as the Advanced Transportation and Urban Scientist at
the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Transportation & Hydrogen
System Center in Golden, Colorado, leading research efforts into the
impacts of new mobility systems, particularly in urban areas. He was
appointed as the DOE technologist-in-city for the Columbus Smart City
program in 2016, and continues in that role to the present. Dr. Young
leads the Urban Science pillar as part of the US Department of Energy
SMART Mobility research initiative. As pillar lead he initiated the
development of the Automated Mobility District toolkit to assess the mobility and energy
impacts resulting from the deployment of automated electric shuttles, and other
automated mobility systems at a district scale. He initiated the development of the
Mobility Energy Productivity metric, which has become the central metric through which
the DOE’s Energy Efficient Mobility Systems programmed is assessed. This metric is
moving forward as a provisional standard through ASCE in 2019. From 2006 through
2015 while on staff at the University of Maryland’s Center for Advanced Transportation
Technology, he architected of the multi-state traffic monitoring system based on vehicles
self-reporting their position and speed. The system, known as the I-95 Vehicle Probe
Project, remains the largest multi-state traffic monitoring systems to this day. He co-
developed and patented a Bluetooth re-identification traffic sensor to directly sample
vehicle travel times, and co-founded Traffax Inc. to accelerate the commercialization of
the technology. Previous appointments include the Kansas Department of Transportation
from 1994-06, the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab 1994-96, and volunteer with the
United States Peace Corps in Cameroon, West Africa.

Stan Young´╗┐

Senior Research Scientist

NREL

Dr. Young serves as the Advanced Transportation and Urban Scientist at
the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Transportation & Hydrogen
System Center in Golden, Colorado, leading research efforts into the
impacts of new mobility systems, particularly in urban areas. He was
appointed as the DOE technologist-in-city for the Columbus Smart City
program in 2016, and continues in that role to the present. Dr. Young
leads the Urban Science pillar as part of the US Department of Energy
SMART Mobility research initiative. As pillar lead he initiated the
development of the Automated Mobility District toolkit to assess the mobility and energy
impacts resulting from the deployment of automated electric shuttles, and other
automated mobility systems at a district scale. He initiated the development of the
Mobility Energy Productivity metric, which has become the central metric through which
the DOE’s Energy Efficient Mobility Systems programmed is assessed. This metric is
moving forward as a provisional standard through ASCE in 2019. From 2006 through
2015 while on staff at the University of Maryland’s Center for Advanced Transportation
Technology, he architected of the multi-state traffic monitoring system based on vehicles
self-reporting their position and speed. The system, known as the I-95 Vehicle Probe
Project, remains the largest multi-state traffic monitoring systems to this day. He co-
developed and patented a Bluetooth re-identification traffic sensor to directly sample
vehicle travel times, and co-founded Traffax Inc. to accelerate the commercialization of
the technology. Previous appointments include the Kansas Department of Transportation
from 1994-06, the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab 1994-96, and volunteer with the
United States Peace Corps in Cameroon, West Africa.